Science and Me – Functional Foods

Dr. Louise Horrigan, Lecturer in Physiology in NUI Galway
Dr. Louise Horrigan, Lecturer in Physiology in NUI Galway (Photo credit, Enda O’Connell)

In the third in our series of Research Videos for 2016, Dr. Louise Horrigan, Physiology Lecturer in the College of Medicine and Health Sciences, introduces the topic of Functional Foods. These are foods that, as well as having nutritional value, have been scientifically proven to give other health benefits, such as lowering cholesterol or treating heart disease. As well as lecturing to NUI Galway students, Louise is also involved in researching the benefits of Blueberry and Hawthorn juices, which you can find out more about here.

Video by Claire Riordan, Science Engagement Associate at CÚRAM .

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The Science of Exercise, by Dr. Nicole Burns

In the fifth of our weekly series of articles by NUI Galway researchers, Dr. Nicole Burns, Lecturer in the Discipline of Physiology, in the School of Medicine, writes about ‘The Science of Exercise’.

Ever notice how, when you walk up three flights of stairs your legs begin to ache and you are a little out of breath? If you put your hand to your chest you may also notice that your heart is beating a little faster than normal.

Were you going “too fast”?

If you slowed down would you still feel your heart beating faster than it was at rest?

If you sped up, would you breathe harder?

A subject seated on a cycle ergometer. A heart rate monitor is worn across the chest under the clothing to measure pulse at rest and during exercise. The facemask is connected to a computer which analyses the expired for percentage oxygen, carbon dioxide and total volume. A blood pressure cuff is worn on the right arm to measure changing blood pressure during exercise. (Photo credit Dr. Nicole Burns)
A subject seated on a cycle ergometer. A heart rate monitor is worn across the chest under the clothing to measure pulse at rest and during exercise. The facemask is connected to a computer which analyses the expired air for percentage oxygen, carbon dioxide and total volume. A blood pressure cuff is worn on the right arm to measure changing blood pressure during exercise. (Photo credit Dr. Nicole Burns)

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